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Roof Types

 

Gabled

Gabled refers to the family of houses classified by the straight slope falling from ridge to eave, creating a peak or triangle on the side or front facade. Gabled houses have rakes on the gable facades and eaves on the non-gabled facades.

Cross-gabled

Houses have additional sections or wings crossing perpendicular to the main section, meeting in a valley, each with its own peaked or gabled facade.

Simple Hip

This family of houses avoids having a peak or triangle at the roof junction by breaking the roof plane along the slope line, allowing the roof to bend or wrap around the house. Hipped houses have an even roof to wall junction all the way around the house and eaves on all sides.

Pyramid Hip

A hipped roof where all four sides come to a point at the roof peak.

Cross-hipped

A roof with multiple sections or wings that cross the main section, meeting in a valley, each with it's own hipped profile.<

Mansard

A hipped roof with two distinct roof pitches, low-slopped from the flat top or ridgeline then breaking to a steep pitch above the wall junction.

Saltbox

A gabled roof with asymmetrical roof faces. The asymmetry produces one facade that is two stories high dropping to a single story or story and one half on the opposite side of the building.

Gambrel

A gabled roof that peaks at the ridgeline then falls away in a broad, low slope, breaks horizontally and changes to a steeper pitch. A gambrel roof has a broad upper story and side facade, and is often associated with barns.

Flat

Actually its own roof type, flat roofs have no slope and may terminate with or without eaves.

Shed

A gabled roof with a single roof face falling away from the main building. Shed roofs are often used for porches, additions, and raised-roof sections.
 

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